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What Are The Causes And Indicators Of An Achilles Tendon Rupture

Overview

The Achilles tendon connects your calf muscles to your heel bone. Together, they help you push your heel off the ground and go up on your toes. You use these muscles and your Achilles tendon when you walk, run, and jump. If your Achilles tendon stretches too far, it can tear or rupture. If this happens, you may hear a snapping, cracking, or popping sound and feel a sharp pain in the back of your leg or ankle. Have trouble moving your foot to walk or go up stairs. Have difficulty standing on your toes. Have bruising or swelling in your leg or foot.


Causes
Ruptured Achilles tendons may result from falling from a height or down a hole. Increasing training intensity abruptly, boosting distance, frequency or duration by more than 10% a week. Failing to stretch before and after exercise. Repetitive training, especially uphill running. Deyhydration, which causes cramping and tightness in the calves. Taking antibiotics. Improper footwear. Explosive movements in competitive sports like basketball, soccer or track & field.


Symptoms
Following are a few of the symptoms usually associated with an Achilles tendon rupture. Sudden, severe pain, swelling, bruising, difficulty walking. Sometimes a gap may be felt in the tendon. The most common ways an Achilles tendon rupture is diagnosed are clinical history (presenting symptoms). Thompson or Simmonds? test, positive if when squeezing the calf there is no foot movement (passive planter flextion). O?Brien?s test, needles are placed into the tendon; tendon is intact if when the foot is moved up and down, the needle hub moves in the same direction as the toes (opposite direction of the tendon) Ultrasound and MRI, because these technologies involve an added expense, they are usually employed only to confirm the diagnosis.


Diagnosis
During the clinical examination, the patient will have significantly reduced ankle plantar flexion strength on the involved side. When the tendon is palpated with one finger on either side, the tendon can be followed from the calcaneus to where it “disappears” in the area of the rupture and to where it then returns 2 to 3 cm proximal to the rupture. If the injury is recent, the patient indicates that her pain is localized at the site of the rupture. The defect eventually fills with blood and edema and the skin over the area becomes ecchymotic.


Non Surgical Treatment
This condition should be diagnosed and treated as soon as possible, because prompt treatment probably improves recovery. You may need to be referred urgently to see a doctor in an orthopaedic department or accident and emergency department. Meanwhile, if a ruptured Achilles tendon is suspected, you should not put any weight on that foot, so do not walk on it at all.Treatment options for an Achilles tendon rupture include surgical and non-surgical approaches. The decision of whether to proceed with surgery or non-surgical treatment is based on the severity of the rupture and the patient?s health status and activity level. Non-surgical treatment, which is generally associated with a higher rate of re-rupture, is selected for minor ruptures, less active patients, and those with medical conditions that prevent them from undergoing surgery. Non-surgical treatment involves use of a cast, walking boot, or brace to restrict motion and allow the torn tendon to heal.


Surgical Treatment
In general, Achilles tendon repair surgery has a much higher success rate and lower incidences of re-rupture than non-surgical methods of treatment. It is preferred by the nation?s leading athletes as the best course of action, allowing them to return to previous activity and performance levels at a much faster rate, with a lower chance or re-injury and less potential muscle loss.


Prevention
Good flexibility of the calf muscles plays an essential role in the prevention of Achilles tendon injuries. It is also important to include balance and stability work as part of the training programme. This should include work for the deep-seated abdominal muscles and for the muscles that control the hip. This might at first appear odd, given the fact that the Achilles are a good distance from these areas, but developing strength and control in this area (core stability) can boost control at the knee and ankle joints. Training errors should be avoided. The volume, intensity and frequency of training should be monitored carefully, and gradually progressed, particularly when introducing new modes of training to the programme. Abrupt changes in training load are the primary cause of Achilles tendinopathy.

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